Binocular Vision

'Binocular Vision'

Binocular Vision

Binocular Vision is a unique ability bestowed upon humans in whom both eyes are set on the front of the face. Binocular Vision is achieved by the coordinated use of both eyes to ‘see’ a single three-dimensional image of the surroundings.

One often wonders how two eyes in a person can eventually produce one single image. It is due to great teamwork between the two eyes and the brain!

The field of view, which is the area one can see when one eye is closed, overlaps significantly with the view from the other eye. These images are then fused and appear as a single image through a complex process that involves the retina and an interpretation by the brain through the visual pathway.

Binocular Vision gives a precise perception of depth and an enlarged field of vision.
This ability for precise Binocular Vision begins to develop after birth. Significant focus is achieved by 6 months in infants. However, the accuracy and sharpness of images acquired along with depth perception ​continues to predominantly develop by 4 years, and gradually improve to its final stage by 9 years of age.

What happens when Binocular Vision is impaired?

Abnormalities of Binocular Vision are common visual disorders. They are generally associated with symptoms such as headaches, eye strain, eye pain, blurred vision, poor depth perception and occasionally double vision. Commonly known conditions having Binocular Vision impairment are:
  • Computer Vision Syndrome (CVS) or Digital Eye Strain (DES)
  • Lazy Eye or Amblyopia

Reasons for Binocular Vision impairment

For our brain to convert two images into one clear image, both the eyes need to be in perfect alignment, and work in a perfectly synchronized manner. In case the eyes are not in sync, and transmit two images to the brain that are not completely aligned, the brain will not accept this situation and will force the eye muscles which produce the alignment to fix the problem by realigning the eyes. When this happens often, it puts a lot of strain on the eye muscles. The eyes then become tired and sore, leading to a variety of painful symptoms such as headaches.
Three common reasons why Binocular Vision might become reduced or lost altogether, includes:
  • Reduced vision in one eye.
  • Problems with the brain comparing images from both eyes.
  • Loss of coordination of movement between the two eyes.
  • Weak focusing abilities of the eye muscles

Symptoms of Binocular Vision impairment

Symptoms while reading
  • Fatigue
  • Reading once again for better comprehension
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Using a ruler or finger to guide through lines
  • Vibration of letters
  • Headache
  • Eye pain and soreness
Symptoms during daily activities
  • Blurred, double or shadowed vision
  • Poor perception of depth
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Difficulty with glare
  • Difficulty while driving due to inability to judge distances and glare of headlights at night
  • Difficulty while climbing down steps

Seeing Double makes it hard to read

Reading text like the image above is difficult to read! A child may have to read over and over again, thus slowing them down. They do not understand that this is not normal. The frustration arising from this can make the child aloof or even go into depression. Quite often, the child’s inability to comprehend school work may have an underlying problem of a Binocular Vision disorder which may be undetected. Unfortunately, some children get slotted into having a learning disability. Detecting such a Binocular Vision disorder early can prevent a lot of struggle for a child and their family.
New research has shown that even adults can now be treated for undiagnosed/uncorrected Binocular Vision disorders.
If you can relate to any of the above symptoms, you need to consult your eye specialist to get the treatment for a Binocular Vision disorder.

Amblyopia / Lazy Eye

Amblyopia, commonly known as ‘Lazy eyes’ is a condition in which the vision of one eye or both eyes is reduced.

Amblyopia / Lazy Eye

Amblyopia, commonly known as ‘Lazy eyes’ is a condition in which the vision of one eye or both eyes is reduced
Know More

Computer Vision Syndrome/ Digital Eye Strain

Use of digital media is rising across all age groups. More and more people are spending increasing amount..

Computer Vision Syndrome/ Digital Eye Strain

Use of digital media is rising across all age groups. More and more people are spending increasing amount..
Know More

After Vision Corrective Surgery

Say Goodbye to Visual Difficulties After Cataract/ Refractive Eye Surgery, Train Your Brain to View Better, Faster

After Vision Corrective Surgery

Say Goodbye to Visual Difficulties After Cataract/ Refractive Eye Surgery, Train Your Brain to View Better, Faster
Know More

Find Nearest Clinic